Any similarities are purely coincidental. Anyway, I think this looks quite familiar and “Bao Hu San” translates into protective umbrella, so they are actually Shanghai Ruilan Protective Umbrella Biotech Limited.

Chinese hackers have used a zero-day in the Trend Micro OfficeScan antivirus during their attacks on Mitsubishi Electric, ZDNet has learned from sources close to the investigation.

Trend Micro has now patched the vulnerability, but the company did not comment if the zero-day was used in other attacks beyond Mitsubishi Electric.

Source: ZDNet

The more snake-oil you put on something the larger the attack vector gets.

You enter a cave. At the end of a dark corridor, you encounter a pair of sealed chambers. Inside each chamber is an all-knowing wizard. The prophecy says that with these oracles’ help, you can learn the answers to unanswerable problems. But there’s a catch: The oracles don’t always tell the truth. And though they cannot communicate with each other, their seemingly random responses to your questions are actually connected by the very fabric of the universe. To get the answer you seek, you must first devise… the questions.

Computer scientists are buzzing about a new mathematical proof that proposes a quantum-entangled system sort of like the one described above. It seems to disprovea 44-year-old conjecture and details a theoretical machine capable of solving the famous halting problem, which says a computer cannot determine whether it will ever be able to solve a problem it’s currently trying to solve.

The 150-page proof, titled simply “MIP*=RE,” deals in the esoteric subject of computational complexity. If it holds under scrutiny, it demonstrates a profound connection between quantum physics, computation, and mathematics. It shows that a theoretical class of computing devices—a verifier interrogating the quantum-entangled oracles—can check some of the most complex computer problems imaginable. And it has important implications for quantum physicists.

Source: Gizmodo

Mozilla Firefox prior to version 72 suffers from Small Subgroups Key Recovery Attack on DH in the WebCrypto‘s API. The Firefox’s team fixed the issue removing completely support for DH over finite fields (that is not in the WebCrypto standard).

Source: Into The Symmetry

Recently, I experienced I/O issues while trying to scan documents on my Samsung SL-C460W. It has worked flawlessly with Windows 10 before, so seems like something changed in the latest Windows 10 build.

Reinstalling the Samsung scanner driver didn’t help, also scanning by WIA did not work. Communicating with the scanner was no longer possible, while printing works without any issues.

Seems like due to changes in recent Windows 10 builds two file have been removed which are required by the scanner driver to be able to communicate with the device.

Luckily Samsung has provied a fix for that. Officially it’s meant for some other multi-functional device, but it works fine with the C460 series, too.

Find it on the Samsung webpage.

Just as was true when the Mueller investigation closed without a single American being charged with criminally conspiring with Russia over the 2016 election, Wednesday’s issuance of the long-waited report from the Department of Justice’s Inspector General reveals that years of major claims and narratives from the U.S. media were utter frauds.

Before evaluating the media component of this scandal, the FBI’s gross abuse of its power – its serial deceit – is so grave and manifest that it requires little effort to demonstrate it. In sum, the IG Report documents multiple instances in which the FBI – in order to convince a FISA court to allow it spy on former Trump campaign operative Carter Page during the 2016 election – manipulated documents, concealed crucial exonerating evidence, and touted what it knew were unreliable if not outright false claims.

If you don’t consider FBI lying, concealment of evidence, and manipulation of documents in order to spy on a U.S. citizen in the middle of a presidential campaign to be a major scandal, what is? But none of this is aberrational: the FBI still has its headquarters in a building named after J. Edgar Hoover – who constantly blackmailed elected officials with dossiers and tried to blackmail Martin Luther King into killing himself – because that’s what these security state agencies are. They are out-of-control, virtually unlimited police state factions that lie, abuse their spying and law enforcement powers, and subvert democracy and civic and political freedoms as a matter of course.

Source/Continue reading: The Intercept

Avast, the multibillion-dollar Czech security company, doesn’t just make money from protecting its 400 million users’ information. It also profits in part because of sales of users’ Web browsing habits and has been doing so since at least 2013.

That’s led to some labelling its tools “spyware,” the very thing Avast is supposed to be protecting users from. Both Mozilla and Opera were concerned enough to remove some Avast tools from their add-on stores earlier this month, though the anti-virus provider says it’s working with Mozilla to get its products back online.

But recently appointed chief executive Ondrej Vlcek tells Forbes there’s no privacy scandal here. All that user information that it sells cannot be traced back to individual users, he asserts.

Source: Forbes

I love the last sentence of this quote. That’s like, the surveillance cameras don’t monitor you. They are just monitoring the streets.

Real-time data and analytics and machine learning and AI creates unpreparedness by corporations and Big Tech companies.

Source: cyberscoop

That’s what the bot said, and he seems smarter than the people who use him.

Players trying to launch Tron: Evolution are now met with a message telling them that the ‘serial key has expired’. This applies to the retail version as well as the Steam version which is delisted from the store. Players who previously bought the game from Steam cannot play the game.

Source: PCGamingWiki

I guess, pirates don’t face this issue.

Old and busted: people lose their jobs due to outsourcing production into third-world countries.

New hotness: robots lose their jobs due to outsourcing production into third-world countries.

Adidas plans to close high-tech “robot” factories in Germany and the United States that it launched to bring production closer to customers, saying Monday that deploying some of the technology in Asia would be “more economic and flexible.”

The Adidas factories were part of a drive to meet demand for faster delivery of new styles to its major markets and to counter rising wages in Asia and higher shipping costs. It originally planned a global network of similar factories.

The German sportswear company did not give details on why it was closing the facilities, which have proved expensive and where the technology has been difficult to extend to different products.

Martin Shankland, Adidas’ head of global operations, said the factories had helped the company improve its expertise in innovative manufacturing, but it aimed to apply what it had learned with its suppliers.

Adidas started production of shoes largely by robots at its “Speedfactory” in the southern town of Ansbach near its Bavarian headquarters in 2016 and opened another near Atlanta in 2017.

Founded by German cobbler Adi Dassler in 1949, Adidas has shifted most of its production from Europe to Asia and now relies on more than 1 million workers in contract factories, particularly in China and Vietnam.

However, Adidas said Monday that production at the two factories would be discontinued by April 2020 at the latest as it focuses instead on using the technologies they pioneered to produce shoes at two of its suppliers in Asia.

The suppliers would use the techniques to make a broader range of products with a short production time, not just running shoes, while Adidas will keep testing manufacturing processes at its so-called adiLab site in Scheinfeld, Germany.

It said it would continue to work with Oechsler, the German company that operates the two factories, in other manufacturing areas, such as producing soles for its springy Boost shoes, as well as soles for soccer shoes and advanced 3D-printed soles.

Source: New York Post

  • About

    We never asked for this.