On Sunday, Eindhoven University of Technology researcher Björn Ruytenberg revealed the details of a new attack method he’s calling Thunderspy. On Thunderbolt-enabled Windows or Linux PCs manufactured before 2019, his technique can bypass the login screen of a sleeping or locked computer—and even its hard disk encryption—to gain full access to the computer’s data. And while his attack in many cases requires opening a target laptop’s case with a screwdriver, it leaves no trace of intrusion and can be pulled off in just a few minutes. That opens a new avenue to what the security industry calls an “evil maid attack,” the threat of any hacker who can get alone time with a computer in, say, a hotel room. Ruytenberg says there’s no easy software fix, only disabling the Thunderbolt port altogether.

Source: Wired

See Björn Ruytenberg’s “Breaking Thunderbolt Protocol Security: Vulnerability Report 2020” for any details. Here’s a local copy in case it gets depublished for any reason.

Recently, I experienced I/O issues while trying to scan documents on my Samsung SL-C460W. It has worked flawlessly with Windows 10 before, so seems like something changed in the latest Windows 10 build.

Reinstalling the Samsung scanner driver didn’t help, also scanning by WIA did not work. Communicating with the scanner was no longer possible, while printing works without any issues.

Seems like due to changes in recent Windows 10 builds two file have been removed which are required by the scanner driver to be able to communicate with the device.

Luckily Samsung has provied a fix for that. Officially it’s meant for some other multi-functional device, but it works fine with the C460 series, too.

Find it on the Samsung webpage.

2019-05-07 @ 08:01: Linux kernel for Windows Linux | Windows

From June 2019 the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) will feature a real Linux kernel. While the current WSL1 is just some kind of wrapper, an incomplete Linux distribution with lots of limitations, the new WSL2 will feature full system call compatibility.

To my mind this will make use of Hyper-V, which in turn will likely block access to VT-x for other virtual environments such as VirtualBox and VMware. So, quite a clever move by Microsoft.

Luckily they’ll support further development of WSL1, too.

Read more at Microsoft.


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